Grammar homework due Tuesday 24th April 2018

On Tuesday, we will be looking at main and subordinate clauses in sentences. In order to differentiate between the two, the children need to know commonly occurring conjunctions (subordinate and co-ordinating). We would like them to post:

A) a definition of a clause and why it is different from a phrase.

B) a definition of a main clause.

C) a definition of a subordinate clause.

D) a list of co-ordinating conjunctions.

E) common subordinating conjunctions.

26 Replies to “Grammar homework due Tuesday 24th April 2018”

  1. A) all sentences are made up of collections of words called clauses and phrases. The clause is the complete sentence on its own but must always have a verb in it. For example, the dog ran in the park. The dog is the subject. A phrase is different as it has no subject.

    B) a main clause is clause or sentence that contains a subject and an object. They also make sense on their own. ‘I love dog’s.

    C) a subordinate clause contains a subject and a verb but it needs to be attached to a main clause to make sense.

    D) for, and, nor,but, or, yet, so

    E) after,although, as, because, before, even if,even though, if, once, rather than, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, whenever, where, wherever, whether, while, why

  2. 1) If a sentence has a clause it will have both a subject and a verb. A phrase either has a verb or a noun but it will never have both.

    2/3) To make a subordinate clause make sense you must add a main clause. Main clauses make sense on their own.
    For example:
    When she screams, it is very loud.
    The subordinate clause is ‘when she screams.’ The main clause is ‘It is very loud’
    The subordinate is added to the main clause to make sense.

    4) To Remember Co-ordinating conjunctions you can remember FANBOYS:
    F or
    A nd
    N or
    B ut
    O r
    Y et
    S o

    5) There are also subordinating conjunctions:
    As , who , which, when , after, once, before, while, although, though, unless, till, who.

  3. A clause: A clause is a group of words that contains a verb (and usually other components too). A clause may form part of a sentence or it may be a complete sentence by itself.

    Main clause: A clause that can form a complete sentence standing alone, having a subject and a predicate.

    Subordinate clause: A clause, typically introduced by a conjunction, that forms part of and is dependent on the main clause.

    Common subordinating conjunctions:
    after,
    before,
    as soon as,
    when,
    since,
    until,
    because,
    so,
    now that,
    in order that,
    as if,
    wether,
    as long as,
    unless,
    provided that,
    so long as,
    if,
    while,
    although,
    even though,
    though,
    whereas,
    even if,
    whenever.

    Co-ordinating conjunctions:
    For
    And
    Nor
    But
    Or
    Yet
    So

  4. A] A definition of a clause and its different from a phrase is they both understand punctuation .
    B] a definition of a main clause is a sentence can stand alone
    C] a subordinating clause is also called a dependant clause
    D] and,but,so,for,nor,

  5. A) a unit of grammar organization next below the sentence in rank . It is different cause is a group of 2 or more words that song have a subject.
    B) it can form a complete sentence.
    C)it is a conjunction that forms part of and needs a main clause
    D) and but so yet for or
    E)after as because before till since

  6. A) A clause is a group of words that contain a subject and a verb.
    B) A main clause is a clause that can be used as a sentence alone.
    C) A subordinate clause is a clause that is introduced by a conjunction
    D) And, But, For, Nor, Or, So, Yet.
    E) After, Although, As, Because, If, While, Where, Than, Until.

  7. 1) if a subject and a verb is together with a predicate it is a clause a small group of words together.
    2) a clause that can form a complete sentence standing alone.
    3) a clause with an conjunction that depends with an main clause.
    4) for, nor, so, or, yet, and , but.
    5) subordinating conjunctions join subordinating clause to a main clause like after, although, as, if, before.

  8. Ashiki’s Homework
    Main clauses and subordinate clauses
    A) a definition of a clause and why it is different from a phrase.
    A clause is different from a phrase because it contains a verb. Also, a phrase shouldn’t include either verb or subject while a clause does. To remember this, you should think of the clause vultures have claws. Vultures is the subject. Have is the verb and claws is the noun and claws reminds you that you find a verb in a clause.
    B) a definition of a main clause.
    A main clause is the main part of a sentence. It makes sense if you read it on its own without the rest of the sentence. It is a stand-alone sentence and contains a verb and subject.
    For example: Inside the garden, I saw a cat.
    There is a main clause and a subordinate clause in the sentence. The comma separates the two clauses; if you read each clause you would realise which clause is the main clause. Inside the garden, doesn’t make sense on its own but I saw a cat makes perfect sense on its own. I saw a cat is the main clause. Inside the garden is a phrase as it does not contain a verb.
    C) a definition of a subordinate clause.
    A subordinate clause is also known as a dependent clause meaning it will not make sense on its own. You must add to the sentence so it makes sense. If you read a subordinate clause you will wonder how it finishes because it needs a main clause to make sense. A subordinate clause will always begin with a subordinate conjunction or a relative pronoun; a relative clause is also a subordinate clause. It will contain a subject and verb but is not stand-alone. A subordinate clause is not a phrase. If the subordinating conjunction is at the start, you must have a comma after the subordinating conjunction clause.
    D) a list of co-ordinating conjunctions.
    Co-ordinating conjunctions are connectives. They connect two sentences together using a conjunction or words and phrases. There are 7 co-ordinating conjunctions and a straightforward way of remembering them is the acronym FANBOYS.
    FANBOYS stand for:
    • For
    • And
    • Nor
    • But
    • Or
    • Yet
    • So
    That is all the co-ordinating conjunctions.
    E) common subordinating conjunctions.
    Subordinating conjunctions can come at the start or the middle of a sentence. Here are some examples subordinating conjunctions:
    • As
    • Because
    • Although
    • Furthermore
    • In addition
    • Also
    • However
    • Consequently
    • After
    • Besides
    • Provided that
    • Even though
    • Once
    • Unless
    • Whereas
    • Never-less
    • Whenever I
    • Rather than
    • Wherever
    • Since
    • Though
    • When
    • While
    • Despite
    • If
    Relative pronouns
    • Who
    • Which
    • Whose
    • Whichever
    • Where
    • Wherever
    • That
    • Whoever
    • Whosever
    • Whomever

    Examples of sentences with conjunctions

    While I watered the plants, I sang a song.
    Her day was miserable despite earning a house point.
    The house, which smelt of flowers, was painted blue.
    In the park, the dog played catch.
    I love soup yet my sister hates it.
    She pulled my hair so I pulled hers back.

  9. A) A clause is a sentence that constants a verb. The difference between a clause and a phrase is that a phrase does not have a verb
    B) A sentence that would make sense on its own.
    C) A clause that would contestant a conjunction wilt adding extra info .
    D) for,and,nor,but,or,yet and so.
    E) after, as, if, even if , before , because , than ,that, when, where

  10. A main Clause is a clause that makes sense on Its own
    A subordanate clause doesnt make sense on ITS own so it needs a main Clause
    For and so nor but or
    After i went to school

  11. A phrase is a group of words that has either no subject or no predicate.
    A clause is a group of words containing both a subject and a predicate.
    A clause that can form a complete sentence standing alone, having a subject and a predicate. Contrasted with subordinate clause.
    A clause, typically introduced by a conjunction, that forms part of and is dependent on a main clause (e.g. ‘when it rang’ in ‘she answered the phone when it rang’).
    For, And, Nor But, Or ,Yet ,So
    After,Although,As ,Because,Before,It Since

  12. A clause is a group of words that contain a subject and a verb.
    A main clause is a clause that can be used as a senten A subordinate clause is a clause that is introduced by a conjunction
    And, But, For, Nor, Or, So, Yet.
    After, Although, As, Because, If, While, Where, Than, Until.

  13. 1. a phrase contains a noun or a verb whilst a clause contains a noun and a verb
    2. a main clause makes sense on its own
    3. a subordinate clause adds extra information and does not make sense on its own
    4. for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so
    5. after, although, as, because, before, even though, if, once, since, while

  14. A) a definition of a clause and why it is different from a phrase.
    a clause has a verb and a subject. It is different from a phrase because it can be a sentence on its own.
    B) a definition of a main clause.
    mum is going to buy me some new shoes.
    C) a definition of a subordinate clause.
    while the kangaroo crossed the road.
    D) a list of co-ordinating conjunctions.
    for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so
    E) common subordinating conjunctions.
    after, as, because, if, once

  15. 1. a clause is a group of words with both subject and a verb.
    2. a subordinating clause are used to add more information to a sentence
    3.a main claus has its own individial meaning means that it can stand on its own
    4.FANBOYS
    5.after, although, as, as if ,since, before.

  16. 1 a claws is a group of words with both subject and a verb

    2a subordinte cluwas are youed to add more infomation to a santense
    3 main clause has it’s own inderfishol meaning that it can stand on it own
    4 FANBOYS
    5 after althouow as,as if,since before

  17. 1.A clause is a group of words with both a subject and a verb.
    2.A main clause has its own individual meaning therefore it can start on its own .
    3.Subordinate clauses are used to add more information to sentences.
    4.For,and,nor,but,or,yet,so.
    5.After,although,as if,as long as,as soon as.

  18. 1. A clause is a group of words with both a subject and a verb.
    2. A main clause has its own individual meaning therefore it can stand on its own.
    3. Subordinate clauses are used to add more information to sentences.
    4. For, and, nor, but, or, yet, so.
    5. After, although, as, as if, as long as, as soon as.

  19. A clause:
    A clause is like a phrase but is different is different because it doesn’t include a verb.
    A main clause:
    A clause that can form a complete sentence standing alone, having a subject and verb.
    A subordinate clause:
    A clause which needs a main clause for the sentence to make sense.

    Co-ordinating conjunctions:
    FANBOYS
    For
    And
    Nor
    But
    Or
    Yet
    So

    Common subordinating conjunctions:
    after
    once
    until
    although
    provided that
    when
    as
    rather than
    whenever
    because
    since
    where
    before
    so that
    whereas
    if
    though
    will

  20. A)A clause has a verb and a subject verbs kill phrases

    B)A clause that can form a complete sentence standing alone having a subject and predicate

    C)A clause that does not make sense alone

    D)For
    And
    Nor
    But
    Or
    Yet
    So

    E)before
    when
    between
    after
    unless
    despite
    until

  21. A a unit of grammatical organization next below the sentence in rank and in traditional grammar said to consist of a subject and predicate.

    B a clause that can form a complete sentence standing alone, having a subject and a predicate.

    C a clause, typically introduced by a conjunction, that forms part of and is dependent on a main clause (e.g. ‘when it rang’ in ‘she answered the phone when it rang’).

    D And

    But

    for

    nor

    or

    so

    yet

    E after as if, even if before because than that when where

    1. A) all sentences are made up of collections of words called clauses and phrases. The clause is the complete sentence on its own but must always have a verb in it. For example, the dog ran in the park. The dog is the subject. A phrase is different as it has no subject.

      B) a main clause is clause or sentence that contains a subject and an object. They also make sense on their own. ‘I love dog’s.

      C) a subordinate clause contains a subject and a verb but it needs to be attached to a main clause to make sense.

      D) for, and, nor,but, or, yet, so

      E) after,although, as, because, before, even if,even though, if, once, rather than, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, whenever, where, wherever, whether, while, why

  22. – Grammar Homework –

    A) a definition of a clause and why it is different from a phrase.

    What are clauses?
    A clause is a group of words that can act as a sentence, but is not necessarily a complete sentence on its own. All clauses contain both a subject and a predicate, which always contains a verb. A predicate tells something about what the subject is doing. Some clauses can stand alone as a complete sentence; others cannot.

    What are phrases?
    A phrase is a group of two or more words that does not have the subject and verb combination and does not form a predicate. It can contain a noun or a verb, but does not have a subject or predicate. Essentially, a phrase provides some sort of additional information or provides more context to the sentences you write. A phrase can never stand alone as a sentence; however, a phrase can nestle itself inside clauses that are either complete sentences on their own or ones that are dependent on the rest of the sentence.

    B) a definition of a main clause.
    In grammar, a main clause is a group of words made up of a subject and a predicate. A main clause (unlike a dependent or subordinate clause) can stand alone as a sentence.

    C) a definition of a subordinate clause.
    A subordinate clause,also called a dependent clause will begin with a subordinate conjunction or a relative pronoun and will contain both a subject and a verb. This combination of words will not form a complete sentence.

    D) a list of co-ordinating conjunctions.
    Co-ordinating conjunctions are connectives. They connect two sentences together using a conjunction or words and phrases. There are 7 co-ordinating conjunctions and a straightforward way of remembering them is the acronym FANBOYS.
    FANBOYS stand for:
    • For
    • And
    • Nor
    • But
    • Or
    • Yet
    • So

    E) common subordinating conjunctions.
    Subordinating conjunctions can come at the start or the middle of a sentence. Here are some examples subordinating conjunctions:
    • As
    • Because
    • Although
    • Furthermore
    • In addition
    • Also
    • However
    • Consequently
    • After
    • Besides
    • Provided that
    • Even though
    • Once
    • Unless
    • Whereas
    • Never-less
    • Whenever I
    • Rather than
    • Wherever
    • Since
    • Though
    • When
    • While
    • Despite
    • If

  23. A) all sentences are made up of collections of words called clauses and phrases. The clause is the complete sentence on its own but must always have a verb in it. For example, the dog ran in the park. The dog is the subject. A phrase is different as it has no subject.

    B) a main clause is clause or sentence that contains a subject and an object. They also make sense on their own. ‘I love dog’s.

    C) a subordinate clause contains a subject and a verb but it needs to be attached to a main clause to make sense.

    D) for, and, nor,but, or, yet, so

    E) after,although, as, because, before, even if,even though, if, once, rather than, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, whenever, where, wherever, whether, while, why

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